HUD loans are part of a vast network of government programs designed to make homeownership a reality

HUD loans are part of a vast network of government programs designed to make homeownership a reality

For low-income Americans with less than favorable credit. However, you have to meet certain requirements. We’ll tell you all you need to know about HUD loans, how to qualify and where to look for other programs if this one isn’t right for you. We can also help you find a financial advisor who can guide you through the entire home buying process.

HUD vs. FHA

We’ll begin with a brief history lesson. The government started the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) in 1934, but later made FHA a part of HUD when the latter was formed in 1965. Both HUD and FHA aim to meet the country’s housing needs, but they have their differences.

FHA focuses on insuring mortgages. It works with a group of lenders and swoops in to save the day if borrowers can’t pay off their loans. While they’re often used to finance houses for individual families, there are FHA loans for multifamily homes, nursing homes and hospitals too. They’re attractive, particularly to first-time homebuyers, because they require low down payments and you can get approved for a mortgage without having a perfect credit score. Not bad.

HUD manages the rapidloan.net/payday-loans/3-month-payday-loans/ reviews FHA. And though it backs an additional set of mortgage loans, HUD serves a broader purpose, too. Homelessness, disaster recovery and urban housing development are all causes that it rallies around. Continue lendo